2021-04-14 12:12:09

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ENGLISH Great God! my sister of Baireuth, my noble Wilhelmina, dead; died in the very hours while we were fighting here.He could not but respect his wife. Her character was beyond all possible reproach. She never uttered a complaint, was cheerful and faithful in every duty. She had rooms assigned her on the second floor of the Berlin palace, where she was comfortably390 lodged and fed, and had modest receptions every Thursday, which were always closed at nine oclock. A gentleman writes from Berlin at this time:

Voltaire and the Jew.Letter from Frederick to DArget.Letter to Wilhelmina.Caustic Letters to Voltaire.Partial Reconciliation.Fredericks brilliant Conversational Powers.His Neglect of his Wife.All Females excluded from his Court.Maupertuis and the Academy.Voltaires Malignity.Fredericks Anger.Correspondence between Voltaire and Maupertuis.Menaces of War.Catt and the King.This that is on the table the king has ordered to be served for you. You are to eat your fill and mind nobody. I am to serve.

Battle of Hohenfriedberg.Religious Antagonism.Anecdote of the King.Retreat of the Austrians.Horrors of War.A slight Pleasantry.Sufferings of the Prussian Army.The Victory of Fontenoy.Fredericks Pecuniary Embarrassments.Executive Abilities of Maria Theresa.Inflexibility of the Austrian Queen.The Retreat to Silesia.The Surprise at Sohr.Military Genius of Frederick.Great Victory of Sohr.Great God! my sister of Baireuth, my noble Wilhelmina, dead; died in the very hours while we were fighting here.

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Choose whatever apartment in our house you like. Regulate yourself all that you want, either for comfort or luxury. Make your arrangements in such a way as that you may be happy and comfortable, and leave it to me to provide for the rest. You will be always entirely free, and master to choose your own way of life. My only pretension is to enchain you by friendship and kindness.

But there was another picture which met the eye of the king very different in its aspect. We know not whether it at all touched his heart. It was that of the poor peasants, with their mothers, their wives, their children, hurrying from their hamlets in all directions, in the utmost dismay. Grandmothers tottered beneath the burden of infant children. Fathers and mothers struggled on with the household goods they were striving to rescue from impending ruin. The cry of maidens and children reached the ear as they fled from the tramp of the war-horse and the approaching carnage of the death-dealing artillery.Linsenbarth, thus left alone, sauntered from the garden back to the esplanade. There he stood quite bewildered. He had walked that day twenty miles beneath a July sun and over the burning sands. He had eaten nothing. He had not a farthing in his pocket.

461 Immediately after the battle Sir Andrew Mitchell called upon the king to congratulate him upon his great victory. General Seidlitz, who had led the two decisive cavalry charges, was in the royal tent. The king, in reply to the congratulations of the English minister, pointed to General Seidlitz and said,On the 7th of July he wrote again to Wilhelmina. The letter420 reveals the anxiety of his heart, and his earnest desire to escape, if possible, from his embarrassments. Wilhelmina had written, offering her services to endeavor to secure peace. The king replied:

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I skip over it, he replied, laughing; and then began to talk of other things. He inquired,

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Apr-14 12:12:09